Tag Archives: chicken

Chicken with 40 cloves of garlic

“Do not eat garlic or onions; for their smell will reveal that you are a peasant.” – Don Quixote

When I was talking about my 2nd list with people, I’d throw out a couple sample items.  Often, I’d offer Chicken With 40 Cloves of Garlic as a sample.  I got a lot of horrified looks.  And a lot of “Wait…40?  40?”.

Yes, we’re using 40 cloves of garlic, kids.  And yes, you will still be able to kiss that certain someone.  Well, unless that certain someone is Edward Cullen (keep dreamin’ sister) Then you might have problems.

Annnnnyway, let’s get started.  I used a couple recipes for this project.  One from The Joy of Cooking and the other from my new favorite cookbook, The New Best Recipe Cookbook from Cook’s Illustrated. And finally, I went to the lady herself, with Barefoot in Paris, by Ina Garten.

Cooks Illustrated and Barefoot in Paris

HItting the books......

First, your pieces of chicken get seasoned liberally with salt and pepper.  Then cook them in batches, a few minutes on each side.  Set them aside and cover with foil…..we’ll get back to this in a bit.

Now, peel your garlic cloves but DO NOT chop them.  This is key.  The smaller you chop your garlic, the stronger the flavor.  So, if we’re using 40 of them, those puppies are going to stay whole:

Cloves of Garlic

This is what 40 cloves of garlic looks like.......

Now we cook these whole cloves in a dutch oven in some oil.  WARNING: this part will make your house smell delicious:

garlic cloves

Dutch oven with 40 cloves of garlic.

And a little bit later….

cloves of garlic

Cloves getting nice and brown....

The garlic gets soft and browned and it just smells different. It’s softer and smells roasted and rich.  Mmmmmm.  Now on to the next step…..

Add your liquid to the pot: a mix of dry white wine and cognac.  Add this to the pot with the garlic, your thyme and bay leaves and bring to a boil.

white wine garlic

Garlic and wine. Win and Win.

The chicken now gets returned to the pot.  My chicken just barely fit in there, but I moved it around every once in awhile.  30 minutes or so, test with your thermometer to make sure you won’t poison anyone, then pull your chicken out of the pot and set aside.

Now crank the heat back up on your sauce.  Pull out 1/2 a cup of the sauce and mix in some flour to make a slurry:

chicken with 40 cloves of garlic sauce

For real, the technical term is slurry....

Whisk the slurry back in the sauce to thicken it and then pour over your pretty plated chicken:

chicken with 40 cloves of garlic

So as I type this it is 10pm and I haven't eaten dinner and seriously this could not look any better.

And now we’re ready to rock.  Serve this deliciousness over mashed potatoes (because why wouldn’t you) and with slices of crusty bread (because the more carbs the better).

So how was the chicken?  Pretty good.  Juicy and roasted, but the real star was the sauce.  And its really weird to write this, but it really didn’t even taste that much like garlic.  This was a totally new kind of garlic.

chicken with 40 cloves of garlic

The Garlic is served!

UNFORESEEN BONUS: Garlic. Is. Amazing.  Cooking garlic this way makes it so incredibly soft you can smear it on bread with a knife.  For real.  Do it.

So try Chicken with 40 Cloves of Garlic if for no other reason than it will be  a totally different garlic experience for you.  And you can make out with your vampire boyfriend afterward.

xoxo Flyover Foodie

p.s. As usual, thank you for being patient with my intermittent blogging.  Work is a liiiitttlle rough right now.  You guys are the best.

The Next List (finally!)

“Ask not what you can do for your country.  Ask what’s for lunch.” – Orson Welles

I have once again been thwarted by distraction:  I had a cold, then I was busy at work, then one night I was sidetracked by “Gossip Girl” (I know…shameful.)  But, I have stalled long enough.

But I'm so distracted by the antics of Upper East Siders on the CW....

Last week I figured out that I was 31 weeks from my 31st birthday.  Being Type-A, I work well with even artificial deadlines, so it seemed fortuitous.  So here goes nothing (cracks knuckles).  Time to conquer another list of quintessential recipes….all of which are new to me.

Strap on your aprons, sharpen those spatulas….we’ve got one ambitious/delicious list in front of us.  Here they are, in the order God intended:

1. Saltimbocca- it means “jump in your mouth”.  Sold.

2. Chicken with 40 Cloves of Garlic- to keep the vampires at bay

3. Egg Drop Soup

4. Baked Alaska – I literally have no idea what this is

5. Calzones

6. Perogies – especially for my mom

7. Baba Au Rhum- “Rhum” = rum so it should be good

8. Pommes Annas- I think this is pretty much layer cake made out of potatoes and butter

9. Pasta Carbonara

10. Rack of Lamb- Valentine’s day dinner?

11. Beer- no really, I’m brewing beer.

12. Gnocchi- pasta made of clouds

13. Plum Pudding- suggested by my London-loving friend

14. Weiner Schnitzel- for the German in all of us

15. Croque Monsieur – or the egg-tastic Croque Madam

16. Homemade Sausage – I didn’t get a sausage stuffer for Christmas for nothing!

17. Eggplant Parmesan

18. Boef Bourguignon – per a request from a Francophile friend

19. English Muffins – my favorite

20. Steak Au Poivre – the Handsome Husband’s favorite

21. Ceviche – hopefully I will not poison anyone.

22. Pickles – totally trendy

23. Something “en flambé”- gather round while I light things on fire!

24. Pheasant- hunted and donated by a friend!

25. Classic Fish and Chips

26. Baklava – from another friend’s family recipe!

27. Crepes

28. Quail with Rose Petal Sauce – from the book “Like Water for Chocolate” 

29. Real macaroni and Cheese – the good stuff!

30. Summer Rolls- fresh and delicious

31. Chicken Kiev – for a “Mad Men” themed night, perhaps?!

Quite the list, huh?  I’m so excited to start cooking/burning/stuffing/eating.  In factI’ve already started!  Thanks for helping with all the ideas….now hit the gym, there is butter ahead.

xoxo The Flyover Foodie

In Support of Overeating

“They that study hard ought not to eat so much as those that work hard, their digestion being not so good.” – Benjamin Franklin

There are a few times a year where we get to indulge; even a few times where we can overindulge.   But I’m a lucky girl: I actually get to overeat once a year to help raise money for a good cause!!

Clean and dainty...no overeating here!

October 20th is the 5th annual Iowa Central American Relief Effort (I-CARE) Eat-A-Thon.   I-CARE is a non-profit started by two of my law school classmates.  After studying abroad and then returning to Nicaragua, they were moved to action by the poverty they witnessed.  And ICARE has grown each year: this year the non-profit began a revolving micro-loan fund to empower people to build a better future for themselves.

Best of all: they cover all the expenses of the non-profit themselves so 100% of the money raised benefits their projects in Central America.  Please read more about I-CARE here.

This is where I come in.  This is my FOURTH year participating in their largest fundraiser: the Eat -A-Thon.  The rules of the Eat A Thon are simple: 2 rounds, 15 minutes total, eat as many chicken wings as possible.  My supporters pledge money per wing…so each wing eaten equals money for charity.

UNFORESEEN BONUS: This is one of the few times I can use “literally” correctly…I have literally eaten as many as humanly possible (without dying) each year.  The evidence:

EXHIBIT A: 2006

Not now bro, I'm in the zone.

The Results: 39 hot wings eaten in 30 minutes.

EXHIBIT B: 2008

Getting down and dirty

Please note the pained look....that is dedication people!!

The results: 46 hot wings eaten in 15 minutes.  (I know…I’m a monster.)

EXHIBIT C: 2009

This must be early...note the clean face.

And the results??  Last year I ate a personal best 47 wings in 15 minutes (Don’t act like you’re not impressed)

Over the  last few years I have eaten 132 wings and raised over $2,000.  Each wing has been worth an average of $10.00.  And next Wednesday….I’m doing it all again!!

If you are a fan of chicken, or charity, or just eating in general, would you consider helping me reach another personal best this year?  You have all been so supportive of this blog and I would love to have your support for my one annual charity event.  Your per wing pledge helps me raise money with EACH hot wing I consume and every penny goes to a good cause.

I mean…how often can you support a good cause that involves hot sauce and Tums.  Lots and lots of tums….

You want in?  Email me at theflyoverfoodie@gmail.com and tell me your pledge.  THAT’S IT!  After the Eat A Thon, the non-profit directors will contact you with the gut-wrenching results and the steps to fulfill your pledge (PayPal, baby!)

Thanks for your support, both moral and financial!!

Any of you ever dabbled in competitive eating?  What food would you dominate an eating contest in?

xoxo Flyover Foodie

p.s. I promise to post post-competitive results here, along with some love for my donors!

Conquering the Poultry Leviathan: Turducken

“Well, we knocked the bastard off !” – Sir Edmund Hillary

Alright loyal eaters, we’ve arrived at the mother lode of food preparation on the list of 30: the turducken.  We’re talking about 35 pounds of poultry layered like delicious nesting dolls of meat and stuffing.  But brace yourself, the preparation is not pretty.  Or brief.  So you might need snacks for this post.  Actually, skip the snacks and just get a beer.  I will do my best to keep the pictures tasteful and the steps  concise.

Put on your mountain climbing face…turducken is the Everest of the poultry world.

Step 1. Hire a sherpa: Read your recipe (over and over) and plot a strategy.

I got a little help with this challenge.  A friend had convinced me to include turducken on my list, with the promise that he would help me my first go around.  He was the Tenzing Norgay to my Hillary.

Per my friend’s suggestion, we used Paul Prudhomme’s recipe for turducken.  The recipe is incredibly thorough and has ALL the ingredients and steps listed, including for the stuffing(s).  Yes, plural.  Also, the final item on the ingredient list IS  “1 small hammer”.  I warned you it wasn’t pretty.

I’m not even going to attempt to summarize the recipe, but you can see the whole thing here.  I read this recipe over and over in the days before cooking so I would have a big picture idea of the whole process and so I wouldn’t panic from the altitude (altitude/butchering).

Step 2. Assemble your climbing gear: Shop for ingredients and order your birds.

We ordered the birds from a specialty deli and had them defrosted on site.  If you’re local, B&B Deli is the way to go.  Plus, while we were waiting for our birds (and lunch!), I got an appetizer.

A little appetizer while waiting to pick up the turkey.

And yes, that’s a piece of deep fried bacon.  They have EVERYTHING at B&B and it’s locally sourced, nose to tail.  I even spotted the elusive sweetbreads in a freezer case.  Also, I knew we were in the right place when I spotted this:

These guys don't mess around

Step 3. Map out the climb: Set your plan of attack.

The turducken party was set for a Saturday evening.  So, I made the stuffing on a Thursday night, Friday evening was reserved for assembly, and the “bird” cooked for about 8 hours on Saturday.  Yes…that’s three days total.   Take the time to develop your strategy and set up your base camp before you head to the summit.

As my counterpart said, “Turducken is less like cooking and more like staging a military invasion.”

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Coq Au Vin

“Why not make daily pleasure out of daily necessity?” – author Peter Mayle

Coq au vin, contrary to my initial impression, is not “fancy” French food.  It actually developed as a way to use the old rooster (the um, coq) in a dish after he was past his prime on the farm.  It’s actually an old and rustic dish and much more of a everyday dish than a fancy indulgence.

And, unlike the soufflé, it won’t judge you for not being able to speak French or asking directions to the Eiffel Tour.  It’s friendly French.

While the traditional recipe calls for a rooster, most contemporary ones, including the recipe I used, substitute a chicken.  Although, I kept thinking of Tom Colicchico on Top Chef in an episode where he kept saying that Casey had NOT made coq au vin because she used a chicken.  Sorry, Tom, but our flyover grocery was out of rooster.

Start by cooking your bacon in the bottom of a large, heavy pot or a dutch oven.  Remove the bacon after its cooked and put the chicken pieces in.  I bought chicken quarters and then broke them down.  Tip: Chicken quarters are insanely inexpensive, so if you get comfortable cutting up chicken, you can be very budget savvy.

The chicken gets browned and removed and in go your chopped veggies to brown in all that yummy flavor.  After the carrots, celery, and garlic are browned the chicken and bacon go back in the pot with the chicken stock, thyme, and dry, red wine.

Half a bottle of dry red wine.

Cooking with wine....a lot of wine.

At this point in the recipe, you can cover the pot and put it in the oven for 30 minutes.  BUT- I didn’t do this.  I just let it simmer away on the top of the stove on low heat while the liquid reduced and let the chicken cook in a bath of wine. See?  So much more easy going than a soufflé!

A bath of wine. Which sounds terribly relaxing.

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